Hard Hitter: Stanton Slackline 631 Frame

UK based Stanton Bikes is a small set-up with one coffee loving man* at the helm: Dan Stanton. Specialising in hardtail frames, Dan’s bikes have gone always gone down a storm. The Slackline model is only a few years old but has already become a classic in its own right.

Stanton Slackline 631

Stanton Slackline 631

This version of the Slackline, with double-butted Reynolds 631 tubing, comes in at £385 and is the cheapest of the three options; the other two being that of 853 tubing (£460) and Titanium tubing (£1,250). We had the opportunity to take out the 631 for a thrashing around the local trails and had a blast!

The Slackline is a multipurpose all-mountain hardcore hardtail frame with a strong 4X/Slalom influence to its design. It is designed to reward style while riding hard in all conditions. The double-butted reynolds 631 tubing used to make the Slackline was chosen for its manipulative properties and excellent vibration damping.

Stanton’s philosophy behind the Slackline instantly attracts those who have wide interests within the sport of mountain biking. It’s a trail bike, it’s going to be tough enough to throw at anything and its geometry lends itself to being ridden hard and fast. We certainly found that it liked the ‘stand up and thrash the pedals’ approach to riding.

If there’s one thing we’ll note about the frame, it’s that sizing is perhaps a tad on the small side. We rode both of the available sizes (16.5 and 18”) and the larger of the two was spot-on for a rider of average height. Taller riders may struggle.

The 31.6mm seat tube diameter is dropper-post friendly and the larger size comes in at 2.55kg, which makes this a viable option as a trail bike that will take you uphill, down dale and over every jump in-between. The head angle is 67.5º, which we think is a ‘safe’ in-between angle – neither too steep nor too slack – and just fine for the style of riding the Slackline is aimed at.

At 16.3” the chainstays are super short, which on the plus side gives the bike a fun and snappy character, on the other hand going for the shortest chainstay possible isn’t always a good thing as it can upset the balance of weight distribution between the wheels, but then if you are in it for ultimate traction and efficiency you probably won’t be buying a hardtail in the first place! We definitely weren’t worrying when throwing the bike into every jump and roller going. The low bottom bracket, coming in at 12.4”, helps to keep your weight in the right place for railing turns.

Coming in at £385 for the frame, we think the Slackline 631 is fairly priced. It’s built in the Far East, but having spoken to Dan Stanton about the bike’s development process, we’re confident that plenty of time and thought, as well as prototyping, has gone into it. The Slackline has been a regular at UK trail centres for a while now and that in itself should bear testament to its ability and quality.

Stanton Slackline 631 vitals

Frame: Reynolds 631 double-butted (Reynolds 525 seat tube and chainstays)
Head angle: 67.5º
Seat angle: 72º
Chainstay length: 16.3”
Bottom bracket height: 12.4”
Top tube (virtual): 23” size 16.5 frame and 24” size 18 frame
Weight: 2.55kg
Sizes: 16.5” and 18”
Chainguide: ISCG 05 tabs
Colours: Electric Blue or Ninja Black

Price: £385
More information: Stanton Slackline 631

*Dan’s office used to be his local Costa Coffee, where he’d spend office hours wired and non-office hours wondering where all the profit went. He’s recently moved out to an actual office…

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